Yearly Archives: 2018

A complete list of training opportunities for 2018
Environmental Education at Nature School Korento (the Dragon Fly)
Posted by

Environmental Education at Nature School Korento (the Dragon Fly)

While we were there we sat in on a class with children who had additional support needs. The class were learning about Finland’s Everyman’s Right, the code for the outdoors and something the Finnish people are very proud of. Eva, our host, said that this is the basis for outdoor education in Finland; to learn to respect the countryside from the first explorations into it.

Commercial Forestry Day 2
Posted by

Commercial Forestry Day 2

The 70-80 year old forest we visited was owned, like many forests in Finland, by a variety of private owners, in this instance including Tampere City Council. Dr Jenni Kokkarinen, lecturer at Tampere University of Applied Sciences provided the group with an introduction to forestry practices in Finland. To all intent and purposes Finland’s timber industry features four main tree species – Norway spruce (Picea abies), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), silver birch (Betula pendula) and aspen (Populus tremula).

Finland Introduction & Day 1
Posted by

Finland Introduction & Day 1

The next stop at Seitseminen was a visit to a patch of old growth forest – perhaps the catalyst for the Park’s creation – and a chance to see what “original” forest might look like in Finland. Surprisingly, we found it strikingly similar to non-old growth forest! Low species diversity in the canopy (Scots pine, Norway spruce, aspen, silver birch, grey alder), all the trees were telegraph pole straight with no large side branches and hardly any “characterful” trees, as we get in many Scottish woods (e.g. Granny pines).

Poland – Bird, Mammal & Butterfly List
Posted by

Poland – Bird, Mammal & Butterfly List

North-west Poland (West Pomerania) and east Germany 10 – 16 June 2018 Sites Czarnocin Odra Delta Nature Park Dąbskie Lake (nr Szczecin) Woliński National Park Wolin Lower Odra Landscape Park Namyślin (near Kostryń) Nationalpark Unteres Odertal Ujście Warty (Mouth of Warta River) National Park Kaleńsko (tern rafts) Birds Greylag Goose Anser anser Recorded at Odra […]

Estonia – a trip of a life time!
Posted by

Estonia – a trip of a life time!

We kept our sacred sites secret so that the foreign occupation regimes that started in 1227
would not destroy them. By remaining attached to our ancient perception of life, we preserved
our identity and remaining whole as people.This is how we preserved a bright silver of the
culture similar to that of peoples in the woodedparts of Europe and this has lasted for millennia.

Scything and Wildlife Management; Ideas from the current situation in Romania and the proposed actions to follow
Posted by

Scything and Wildlife Management; Ideas from the current situation in Romania and the proposed actions to follow

The transfer of skills to the RSPB and National Park volunteers (and others interested in attending) would be an extremely valuable and sustainable asset.  Scything and stacking the fen vegetation may not entirely replace the need to use machinery over this extensive site.  It would however be a very useful addition to the methods available to maintain these important sites for wildlife.   

Hay meadows and their management, using traditional methods to harvest and the challenges faced by local communities
Posted by

Hay meadows and their management, using traditional methods to harvest and the challenges faced by local communities

The hay meadows face many difficulties in a changing Romania. No one can halt the tide of industrialisation, especially if it makes life easier for an aging population. Romanians are not living in a museum, and they must be allowed to change in the same way as we all do. However, the Apuseni mountains – the name translates into Sunset Mountains – feel like they’re on the brink of change, and that change could lead to a complete loss of hay meadow culture. And, as with so many of these things, Europe may not realise the value of this place before it becomes lost to history.

Traditional management of the orchard floor and other hay meadows 
Posted by

Traditional management of the orchard floor and other hay meadows 

The Romanian experience has led to a great deal of reflection on how hay, orchards, amenity grassland, ‘rough grass’ and agricultural set aside is managed in Britain.  The tendency to use rotary mowers and in the agricultural setting mower conditioners, must have an impact on invertebrate life.  In Romania, we were able to experience what is possible with grassland management when it is more sympathetic to biodiversity.  It has been enlightening.

Role of Agri-environment in Romania and what lessons we can learn for schemes in Scotland / UK. The benefits for wildlife of traditional farming systems and the potential challenges of farming becoming bigger units
Posted by

Role of Agri-environment in Romania and what lessons we can learn for schemes in Scotland / UK. The benefits for wildlife of traditional farming systems and the potential challenges of farming becoming bigger units

What did I learn from Romania? Firstly, it reinforced to me how important these less intensively managed High Nature Value landscapes are for wildlife. Whether visiting the beautiful Romanian hay meadows or the Uist’s Machair, these really are special places and we must find ways to make sure communities are given sufficient support to ensure these areas can maintain their biodiversity value. 

Trees in the landscape of Romania, their value to farmers and thoughts about future management
Posted by

Trees in the landscape of Romania, their value to farmers and thoughts about future management

Even though the management of the land has to make economic sense to the Romanians it seems that they do value the importance of trees more so than a lot of English farmers that I work with. This might be because of the way the land is farmer on a smaller scale with less intensive machinery which makes it easier to work around a tree or hedge in the field. This might be because the agri-environment schemes work differently or simply because they recognise that trees have a wide number of benefits that can lead to both economic and environmental sustainability.

All Posts from This Month

Recent Posts

Loading…

Recent Posts

Loading…