Cultural Day & Protection of Birds

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Saturday 8th September, Day 5

Cultural day in Tampere and Protection of Birds in Finland – visiting Puurijarvi-Isosuo National Park (RS)

Now this was one heck of a day which oscillated between serenity and mayhem. We were not to meet Eveliina until the evening so we had the day to ourselves. We started with a relaxed morning rowing on the lake, drinking coffee and even a spot of yoga.

Then we decided to see what Tampere had to offer. On arrival at the Moomin Museum it became apparent that something else was going on – Tracon, year 13 with up to 20,000 attendees expected wearing surreal to sublime costumes in stark contrast to the peaceful, bedtime story mood of the museum.


Following our exciting excursions into the culture of Tampere we drove to collect Eveliina and spend an evening at Puurijarvi-Isosuo National Park
which in ways paralleled the frenetic and the calm of Tampere. Our first stop was at a viewing platform where within moments we all had our binoculars trained on a marsh harrier. When Eveliina succeeded in dragging us away from this platform we walked to the viewing tower to await the cranes…

It wasn’t a long or arduous wait as we had more marsh harriers, sea eagles, red-backed shrikes, waders, ducks, whooper swans, egrets and much, much more to occupy our eyes. Slowly more and more people arrived with giant camera lenses and telescopes as the horizon started to fill with lines of cranes. As the sun edged behind the trees, the noise of the hundreds of birds cut through the excited chatter of the people in the tower.

The tallest bird watching tower in Finland

Cranes flying in to settle for the night

Up until this point I had found the forests of Finland disconcertingly quite and the woodland structure much less variable than I had anticipated, which may have been stupidity on my part as the Boreal Forests are known for being less diverse. However, this combined with Petri’s lecture on preserving biodiversity and a few querying looks when I had asked foresters about bird protection had unsettled me somewhat therefore a wonderful sight to see such a healthy wetland system that was obviously cherished by many.

 disclaimer; one of us was obsessed with getting to the Moomin Museum and everyone else had to suffer for it, yes that would be me!

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Introduction and Finnish Forestry Overview Over two-thirds of Finland is forest cover. This expanse of forest cover may be one of the reasons most of the population seems to be well connected to nature, because most people live within reach of nature. Not only do people live near nature, but many are able to own a small piece of it as much of the forested area is owned by private persons. Accessibility is also important because many people are able to use the forest, even if they do not own any forests themselves. Subject to certain rules and regulations, people are able to use the forest and the wildlife within it as a renewable resource for wood products, hunting and foraging. Above all, most Finnish people strongly value the link between being in nature and good health.

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