Iceland Turf Building 19th – 25th August 2018

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Iceland  19th -25th August 2018

NET 4 Structured Courses

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Day 1 – August 19th

Pick up at Keflavík airport, bright and early. We start the tour at the Settlement Exhibition in downtown Reykjavík where we learn a little about Reykjavík and Iceland’s history and see some 1000-year-old turf. After some lunch we drive up North to Skagafjörður, where we will spend most of the week. The drive takes about 4 hrs. ETA in Skagafjörður is sometime in the afternoon.

Dinner: In Sauðárkrókur: unspecified

 

ACCOMMODATION

While in Skagafjörður, you will be staying at the Puffin Palace-guesthouse (https://puffinpalace.is/en/adalgata-10a/). It is a cosy little guesthouse with 4 twin bedrooms, so you will have to share. The guesthouse is right in the centre of the “old” part of the village of Sauðárkrókur, literally 5 steps away from the local bakery, restaurants and the pub. There is a little kitchen at the guesthouse and breakfast is self-catering.

Day 2 – August 20th

09:00-17:00 Skagafjörður Historical Buildings and Cultural Heritage. Today we visit some of the historical buildings of Skagafjörður belonging to the Nationals Museum Historical Building Collection. Those buildings are examples of Icelandic Vernacular Architecture and gives us examples of the building materials used in the past like turf, stone and timber.

Places: Hólar-Grafarkirkja-Hofsós-Sjávarborgarkirkja

 Lunch: Somewhere on the way

Dinner: Unspecified

 

Day 3 August 21st

08:30-16:30: A turf building course in Tyrfingsstaðir. Participants will learn the basics of turf cutting and building with turf. Note: Building with turf is hard work and rather messy so you will need good boots and work clothes (clothes that may get dirty). Coveralls will be provided for the turf cutting.

Teacher: Helgi Sigurðsson, Fornverk ehf.

 Lunch: A lunch pack

Dinner: A hearty meal after a day of turfbuilding

Evening activities: I do recommend a good long soak in a hot tub at the swimming pool, nothing beats it after a hard day of turfbuilding

Day 4 – August 22nd

08:30-16:30: A turf building course in Tyrfingsstaðir. Participants will learn the basics of turf cutting and building with turf.

Teacher: Helgi Sigurðsson, Fornverk ehf.

Lunch: A lunch pack

Dinner: A hearty meal after a day of turfbuilding

Evening activities: I do recommend a good long soak in a hot tub at the swimming pool, nothing beats it after a hard day of turfbuilding.

Day 5 – August 23rd

08:30-16:30: A turf building course in Tyrfingsstaðir. Participants will learn the basics of turf cutting and building with turf.

Teacher: Helgi Sigurðsson, Fornverk ehf.

Lunch: A lunch pack

Dinner: A hearty meal after a day of turfbuilding

Evening activities: I do recommend a good long soak in a hot tub at the swimming pool, nothing beats it after a hard day of turfbuilding.

Day 6 – August 24th

10-12: Lectures: Skagafjörður Historical Buildings and Cultural Heritage: with the emphasis on turf and turfhouses.

14:00 Glaumbær Museum. A guided tour of the museums exhibition located in a 18th-19th century turf farm.

Lunch: Áskaffi at Glaumbær

Dinner: Unspecified

 

Day 7 – August 25th

09:00-17:00

We leave Skagafjörður in the morning and drive down to Reykjavík with a detour to Þingvellir National Park (http://www.thingvellir.is/english.aspx) and some other places related to Iceland’s cultural and natural history.

 

Day 8- August 26th

Day of departure. The flight leaves at an early hour. Accommodation will be in Keflavík, close to the airport. A shuttle bus will take you from guesthouse to the airport.

 

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