Iceland Turf Building 1st – 8th June 2017

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Iceland  1st – 8th June 2017

NET 3 Structured Courses

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   Fornverkaskólinn  Turf Building

NET – Managing our Natural and Cultural Assets

 

Day 1

Pick up at Keflavík airport. From there we drive straight up North to Skagafjörður with a dinner stop somewhere along the way. The drive takes about 4 hrs so you need to be prepared for a long day. ETA in Skagafjörður is around 01:00.

Accommodation: Keldudalur, Hegranes: http://www.keldudalur.is/. We will be staying in two cottages at a farm about 15 min drive from Sauðárkrókur. The bigger one has 8 beds and the smaller one 2 and you will have to share bedrooms. There is a fully equipped kitchen, veranda with a hot tub and a washing machine.

Day 2

10-11: Tannery Visitor Centre guided tour. The only tannery in Europe that makes fish leather (natural and local materials).

13-16: Lectures: Skagafjörður Historical Buildings and Cultural Heritage.

  • Þór Hjaltalín: Þór is the Cultural Heritage Manager for North West Iceland. He is a historian and an archaeologist. (http://en.minjastofnun.is/).
  • Magnús Freyr Gíslason, The Cultural Heritage Agency of Iceland, architect (http://en.minjastofnun.is/).
  • Sigríður Sigurðardóttir: Sigríður is the Head of the Skagafjörður Heritage Museum, she is a teacher and a historian and has years of experience in conservation of turf buildings.
  • Guðný Zoëga: Guðný is the Head of the Archaeology Department of the Skagafjörður Heritage Museum. She is an archaeologist and a biological anthropologist.

Lunch: Soup and bread at the local bakery

Dinner: Hard Wok Café

 

Day 3

08:30-16:30: A turf building course in Tyrfingsstaðir. Participants will learn the basics of turf cutting and building with turf. Note: Building with turf is hard work and rather messy so you will need good boots and work clothes (clothes that may get dirty). Coveralls will be provided for the turf cutting.

Teacher: Helgi Sigurðsson, Fornverk ehf.

Lunch: A lunch pack

Dinner: Hard Wok

Day 4

08:30-16:30: A turf building course in Tyrfingsstaðir. Participants will learn the basics of turf cutting and building with turf.

Teacher: Helgi Sigurðsson, Fornverk ehf.

Lunch: A lunch pack

Dinner: Hard Wok

Day 5

08:30-16:30: A turf building course in Tyrfingsstaðir. Participants will learn the basics of turf cutting and building with turf.

Teacher: Helgi Sigurðsson, Fornverk ehf.

Lunch: A lunch pack

Dinner: Hard Wok

 

Day 6

09:-17: Skagafjörður Historical Buildings and Cultural Heritage. Today we visit some of the historical buildings of Skagafjörður belonging to the Nationals Museum Historical Building Collection. Those buildings are examples of Icelandic Vernacular Architecture and gives us examples of the building materials used in the past like turf, stone and timber. After dinner if weather permits we will dip into a natural hot pool mentioned in the Sagas.

Places: Hegranesþingstaður-Hólar-Grafarkirkja-Hofsós-Grafarós-Haugsnes-Fosslaug

Lunch: Undir Byrðunni, Hólar

Dinner: Hótel Varmahlíð

 

Day 7

09:-17: Skagafjörður Historical Buildings and Cultural Heritage. We start the day by visiting Reynistaður, the Turf farm and museum at Glaumbær and Víðimýrakirkja. We will have early lunch at Áskaffi. From there we begin our journey to Reykjavík with few stops on the way.

Places: Reynistaður-Glaumbær-Víðimýrarkirkja

Lunch: Áskaffi

Dinner: Hótel Varmahlíð

 

Day 8

Day of departure.  We depart for the airport from Reykjavík City centre at 17:00 and will be at Keflavík airport before 18:00.

 

Suggestions: The Settlement Exhibition, Íslenski bærinn turfhouse and exhibition, Þingvellir

Places we visit:

Various buildings in the National Museums Building Collection: http://www.thjodminjasafn.is/english/for-visitors/historic-buildings-collection/:

Glaumbær, Grafarkirkja Church, Nýibær at Hólar in Hjaltadalur, Reynistaður, Sjávarborgarkirkja Church, Víðimýrarkirkja

The Skagafjörður Heritage Museum:      glaumbaer.is

Hólar Cathedral and Auðunarstofa: visitholar.is

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