Sustainable Development & Biodiversity in Slovenia – A GIS Storymap

Posted by

GIS Storymap Created by Sophie McGraw and content from Alan Crawford, Alistair MacPherson, David Anderson, Elouise Cartner, Julie Mainwood, Kim McEwen, Ross Johnston and Sophie McGraw. 

Click to open up the storymap https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/91be59fa7b9946c19cb5708c6b77eafd

On 4th July 2019, a small group of people working in the environmental and conservation sectors in Scotland, embarked on a week-long exchange trip to Slovenia as part of the ARCH Nature Exchange programme. The ARCH Nature Exchange Trips are funded through the Erasmus+ programme.

The 8 intrepid explorers were: Alan Crawford, Alistair MacPherson, David Anderson, Elouise Cartner, Julie Mainwood, Kim McEwen, Ross Johnston and Sophie McGraw. 

Bojan Žnidaršič from VITRA, the Centre for Sustainable Development Slovenia, played a pivotal role and was instrumental in making our week a great success. He wore many hats during the week as he was our host, our guide, our driver, our teacher to name but a few. 

Bojan put together a very well-organised itinerary for the week and we managed to cover many locations in western Slovenia, immersing ourselves in the culture, and taking in the amazing variety of landscapes and habitats. We got to experience rural life, explored virgin forest, looked down from the towering mountains, were in awe at the variety and abundance of wildlife in the flower rich meadows, and even had time to cool down in the sea. 

We discussed a variety of topics with the people we met including sustainable development, rural depopulation, the growing pressure and opportunity from tourism, and ways of managing habitats for high levels of biodiversity. We also learned so much about Slovenians’ relationship with the natural world and how much they value it. 

We hope you will feel inspired by our story……

Recent Posts

Introduction and Finnish Forestry Overview Over two-thirds of Finland is forest cover. This expanse of forest cover may be one of the reasons most of the population seems to be well connected to nature, because most people live within reach of nature. Not only do people live near nature, but many are able to own a small piece of it as much of the forested area is owned by private persons. Accessibility is also important because many people are able to use the forest, even if they do not own any forests themselves. Subject to certain rules and regulations, people are able to use the forest and the wildlife within it as a renewable resource for wood products, hunting and foraging. Above all, most Finnish people strongly value the link between being in nature and good health.

Loading…