Wetlands Odra Delta Poland 26th Jul – 01st Aug 2017

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button icon Course Details Outline program with Kasimierz Rabski

26th Jul – 01st Aug 2017

Day 1:

Late evening arrival to Szczecin-Goleniow and travel to village Czarnocin near Odra Delta Nature Park

Lodging: Bungalow Park “Gumis” in Czarnocin village

Day 2:

Odra Delta Nature Park (Society for The Coast protected area) a part of NATURA 2000 site

Lodging: Bungalow Park “Gumis” in Czarnocin village

Day 3:

Wolinski National Park and meeting with its staff (cliff coast of Baltic Sea, back delta islands on Szczecin Lagoon, and European bisons herd, National Park and coastal resort Międzyzdroje co-egsistance)

Lodging: Bungalow Park “Gumis” in Czarnocin village

Day 4:

Overview of South Baltic Sea Coast  (small resorts, sandy beaches, culture and nature heritages)

Lodging: Bungalow Park “Gumis” in Czarnocin village

Day 5:

           

Protected areas near town of Szczecin (forests and wetlands including Swidwie Reserve)

Lodging: Pension in small city Nowe Warpno

Day 6:

Lower Odra Landscape Park and meeting with its Staff

Travel to Ujscie Warty National Park (Mouth of Warta National Park)

Lodging: Pension “Lucyna” in village Slonsk

Day 7:

Ujscie Warty NP and meeting with its Staff (one from the most important birdlife area in Poland)

Lodging: Pension “Lucyna” in village Slonsk

Day 8:

Travel from Ujscie warty NP to Drawskie Lakeland and Sczecin-Goleniow airport

Late evening departure from Goleniow airport

Outline Programme for the Society for the Coast

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