POLAND: coastal zone management from pure engineering to pure nature

Posted by

Update 7th May 2020: Course postponed: we will contact participants as soon as we have a confirmed course date. It is possible that some participants will not be able to make the new course date. If you are interested in being on the reserve list please email an expression of interest.

Host: Kazimierz Rabski (Society for the Coast EUCC)

Course Dates: 31 May to 7 June 2020

Application Deadline: 2nd March 2020

Preparation Meeting Date: 14 May 2020

Aims & Themes: coastal zone management including planning, erosion and accumulation; managing coastal protected areas and Natura 2000 sites; tourism versus nature on the coast.

1. Responsibilities of coastal zone management. 2. National Parks management in various types of coasts. 3. Management planning. 4. Technical aspects of coastal zone management. 5.Natura 2000 in coastal areas. 6.Threats and challenges.

1.Selected aspects of coastal zone management. 2. Various types of soft coasts administration and relations to nature values. 3. Tourism versus nature. 4.Erosion and accumulation in the light of management. 5. “Natura 2000” on Polish coast of Baltic Sea

Draft Itinerary:

Route: Gdańsk – Łeba – Jarosławiec – Trzęsacz – Niechorze – Międzyzdroje – Świnoujście – Szczecin – Gdańsk

Organisations: Maritime Offices in Gdynia and Szczecin, Słowiński and Woliński National Park administrations, Society for The Coast (NGO), individual experts.

A herd of cattle standing on top of a lush green field Description automatically generated

Reports from 2019 & 2018 film and earlier.

Click here to download the full NET course list for 2020.

Click here to download the NET 5 2020 application form. (SNH staff are very
welcome to email an expression of interest but they must complete their own internal HR process before submitting an application form)

Recent Posts

Introduction and Finnish Forestry Overview Over two-thirds of Finland is forest cover. This expanse of forest cover may be one of the reasons most of the population seems to be well connected to nature, because most people live within reach of nature. Not only do people live near nature, but many are able to own a small piece of it as much of the forested area is owned by private persons. Accessibility is also important because many people are able to use the forest, even if they do not own any forests themselves. Subject to certain rules and regulations, people are able to use the forest and the wildlife within it as a renewable resource for wood products, hunting and foraging. Above all, most Finnish people strongly value the link between being in nature and good health.

Loading…