The NET Programme: managing our natural & cultural heritage assets

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The NET Programme (Managing Our Natural & Cultural Heritage Assets)

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NET aims to train, inspire and connect Scottish professionals in order to tackle complex issues of nature conservation and culture heritage management. The NET programme has been running for 6 years and each year we send over 100 Scottish heritage professionals to our training host organisations in Europe. Our courses are one week long and each course includes between 6 and 8 participants from Scotland. We carry out consultations with our consortium to identify key training priorities for our sector.

For NET 5 we have set up the training with reference to 6 themes, each course can fit into more than one theme and all courses contain elements exploring the heritage of the host country:

  • Sustainable Development, Farming, Food & Climate Change
  • Biodiversity, Forestry, Hunting
  • Communities, Engagement & Wellbeing
  • Landscape Scale Management, Land Ownership & Access
  • Heritage Interpretation, Tourism & Rural Development
  • Training Systems, New Technologies & Traditional Skills

NET is funded by Erasmus+ as a KA1 Adult Education for Staff programme.

NET Consortium: the NET Programme is implemented through a consortium of leading Scottish heritage organisations. Consortium members assist with setting training priorities, identify participants from their staff and volunteers and with the promotion and dissemination of learning from the courses.

The current consortium for NET 5 includes: Archaeology Scotland, Cairngorms National Park Authority, Caithness Horizons, EBUKI, Forests & Land Scotland, Historic Environment Scotland, Institute of Chartered Foresters, the John Muir Trust, Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park, the National Trust for Scotland, Plantlife Scotland, RSPB, Scottish Countryside Rangers Association (SCRA), Scottish Rural Colleges (SRUC), Scottish Wildlife Trust (SWT), Trees for Life, the Woodland Trust.

Host Partners: we work with a wide range of experienced training organisations in Europe from private organisations, community groups and NGOs, to universities, museums and government agencies. We currently work in 12 European countries: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain. Each of the course summaries contains a link to the website of the host organisation.

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Reporting & Dissemination: one of the strengths of the NET programme is in the quality and diversity of the reporting from the courses. We ask all participants to think about how they can best share their learning with their own networks and peers in Scotland to improve practice or influence policy. All of the reports are available via this website including a searchable archive of reports from previous years. We encourage innovative and thoughtful reporting in the most appropriate format for the audiences you are trying to reach. This has included specialist reports, films, blogs, GIS storymaps, audio and visual diaries, policy recommendations and personal reflections.

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